Psychoanalysis

Nous souhaitons que les travaux des enseignants de l'EPHEP soient accessibles au plus grand nombre de lecteurs de ce site, qui ne sont pas toujours familiarisés autant qu'ils le voudraient avec la langue française. Dans ce cadre, nous mettons à leur disposition un certain nombre de textes, portant sur la psychopathologie ou la psychanalyse, ou encore sur de grands problèmes soulevés par la psychiatrie classique. Nous ne pouvons, en effet, dénoncer les classifications internationales sans présenter à nos lecteurs les moyens de les critiquer.

H.Sheehan : Anxiety : Preserving the objet a

Lacan makes it clear in his Seminar on Anxiety that anxiety is a phenomenon, that it has an object and moreover there seems to be a precise place where we can locate this phenomenon.1 But to do this we need to understand a little of how the subject comes into being and how in turn the subversion of the subject will come about. But this in turn will necessitate our having to confront our own anxiety, and who likes to have to do that? The coming into being of the subject will necessarily involve him in jouissance but this kind of enjoyment as such is really forbidden to the speaking being.

H.Sheehan : Anxiety : Preserving the objet a

H.Sheehan : You're not going out like that, are you ?

Written in 1891, Spring Awakening created a scandal for the 26 year old playwright, Frank Wedenkind (1864-1918). It took 16 years for German Censorship on the drama to be lifted and then with crucial concessions.1 In 1906 it was put on in Berlin by Marx Reinhardt. In England the play was banned from public performance until 1963. In its first performance at the National Theatre London in 1974 the lead role was taken by Veronica Quilligan from Rathmines. The play is a series of brief scenes dealing with the awakening of sexuality in three adolescents, Wendla, Moritz and Melchior.

H.Sheehan : You're not going out like that, are you ?

Helen Sheehan : Sitting there saying nothing.

To arrive at a preliminary definition of the Psychoanalytic Act as described by Lacan in his seminar of 1967-1968 we have to begin by coming to terms with endings, with all their equivocations. There are four such endings which underline this seminar. I will briefly mention three and then say something about the ending appropriate for our psychoanalytic purpose- that which Freud calls Analysis Terminable and Interminable. The other endings are: The end of Metaphysics, the end of Theology and the end of Science...

>> Click here to read the text

Helen Sheehan : Sitting there saying nothing.

J-J.Tyszler : The history of melancholy - 3

This is our third and penultimate seminar for this year. Next time, I’ll assign you a bit of reference work. You will summarize one of the authors whose work, in your view, seems necessary when thinking about melancholy from one of the four angles we’ve been discussing: passion, temporality, affect, or Freudian psychopathology (although I should warn you that Freud will take more time).

J-J.Tyszler : The history of melancholy - 3

J-J.Tyszler : The history of melancholy - 2

Today, we shall study a particular term and its history from the perspective of medical and psychiatric training, one that has sadly disappeared from the nomenclature. Indeed, what we now call “mood disorders” (troubles de l’humeur) used to be called “melancholy.” As a side note, it’s worth pointing out that we tend to use the term “mood disorder(s)” without much reference to the wider situation of “moods ”(humeurs) in general. It is in this context that the disappearance, indeed the mourning (le deuil) of certain words and ideas should be understood – like “melancholy,” “mania” or even “manic-depressive psychosis.” Nowadays we use terms that have far weaker historical references.

J-J.Tyszler : The history of melancholy - 2

J-J.Tyszler : The history of melancholy - 1

The theme I’ve chosen to evoke here demonstrates certain terminological changes in mental health. The term “melancholy” has disappeared from the vocabulary of illnesses, replaced now by “depression” or “bipolar disorders.” During the next few sessions, I’ll attempt to show you some of the difficulties we clinicians experience today regarding the signifiers that enable the transmission of psychopathology. This is a crucial point, and as students you should really get a sense of this evolution, in terms of casuistry, nosography, taxonomy. Words have changed tremendously, and in so doing, they’ve lost much of their flavor. For instance, since the term “depression” is now used to refer to extremely varied states, frankly, the word has lost its meaning – and its pertinence.

J-J.Tyszler : The history of melancholy - 1

Pages